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Home » Blog » Recruiters – Stop Abusing LinkedIn

Recruiters – Stop Abusing LinkedIn

Posted on July 13th, 2015 by Gecko Recruitment

stop abusing

 

(Warning: Light-hearted post coming up, so please don’t take this too seriously….)

 

From its inception, LinkedIn has been the tool of choice for recruiters. It facilitated their stalking, ensured that their prey was concentrated in one place and ensured that they could find out the basic details about their candidates, saving them hours in wasted phone calls and fruitless email campaigns.

They grew their networks, connected with all the “LIONs”, connected with all the random people from far-flung countries, and they even connected with a few people in their own industries.

They joined some industry groups, they thought long and hard about leaving witty comments, and even posted a few links to interesting articles. They were heartened by the engagement and saw that a few people came to their profiles to see who they were.

This was a lightbulb moment for many. LinkedIn could increase their visibility for their clients and their candidates. They didn’t have to go searching for them, the clients and candidates would come to them. Now, don’t get me wrong, LinkedIn is indeed a powerful tool for marketing (I wouldn’t be writing my blogs if I didn’t think that was the case), but there are some recruiters out there who have taken things a little far in their search for online fame….

Firstly, there are the ones who send out a status update requesting that candidates leave their emails in the comments section if they are looking for a job. Actually, I really cannot believe that any self-respecting recruiter would even contemplate doing that, but I wanted to mention it nonetheless.

Then, the “Friday fun” types of posts come along…. “We’ve bought a lottery ticket, so add your email if you want a chance of winning” or “how do you prefer our office décor – like this, or like this?” There is nothing more mindless than a social media herd mentality, but these things seem to take on a mind of their own once a few hapless people have commented.

Suddenly, our dear recruiters become expert mathematicians. I’m not sure that maths has ever been a prerequisite for recruiters, but they love to “share” those devilishly tricky maths problems that we all love. Listen, it’s not clever, it doesn’t add any value, it just sucks up an extra second of my day to scroll past them. I want those seconds back!

Lastly, I am afraid to say that I am not a fan of recruiters posting jobs on the publishing platform. They have an epiphany “Aha – my entire network will be notified that I am looking for this role. I’ll publish it as a blog post.” It also means that their entire network will unfollow them as their notifications are full of similarly lazy posts. The maximum that these posts get are 40 views and maybe one “like” – you can bet that they have liked it themselves.

There are many other examples of recruiters (and everyone else) abusing LinkedIn – wasting both your time and the time of your “precious” connections. However, my rant is coming to an end, and I will get to the point.

Recruiters – use LinkedIn for sourcing candidates. The search metrics are fantastic, and everyone is here. Forget about all the “marketing” and self-promotion. With the very worthy exception of writing a genuine blog post now and again, does it really add to your bottom line?

I’m not so sure.

Phil Dixon is Director at Gecko Recruitment specialists in Rec to Rec for Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

 

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